Inspiring Women: New exhibition at Tunbridge Wells Museum & Art Gallery exhibition

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By kentsussex | Thursday, January 10, 2013, 13:32

From Saturday 19 January, Tunbridge Wells Museum & Art Gallery is showing a fascinating new exhibition which reveals the hidden history of women in the Tunbridge Wells area.  

Focusing on the period from the late 1800s to the 1920s – a time when women's lives changed dramatically – the exhibition shows the important part Tunbridge Wells women played in that process.

From as early as the 1860s, Tunbridge Wells residents were involved in the campaign to win the vote for women.  

Some favoured a strategy of peaceful campaigning, while others supported the militant 'Suffragette' wing of the movement.  

It was the Suffragettes who famously burned down the Nevill Cricket Pavilion in 1913.

The exhibition goes on to show how the First World War brought about new opportunities for many women to move into areas of work previously closed to them.  

These included roles in the police and the military.

The story continues into the 1920s with the work of Tunbridge Wells' first women magistrates and councillors, including social reformer Amelia Scott.

The exhibition showcases the results of a research partnership between the museum and the University of Kent, which has been funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council.  

Researchers Dr Anne Logan and Dr Catherine Lee have explored a range of archival sources to uncover the previously little-known story of women in our area.  

They have brought together information, objects and images – many previously unseen – from the Women's Library, the National Archives and the Museum of London, as well as the Museum's own collections.

The exhibition is on until March 2013. The museum is open daily 9.30am – 5pm and 10am – 4pm on Sundays.

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